Extremes in Rhythm

Posted on: December 17, 2017 by: peter

One of the things that amazes me about Human Design is as you get to know it and understand the expressions in energies you can recognize it in other people. To me that is a level of confirmation about the accuracy of Design. I mean if you can take a person you know very little about and observe a trait and then validate they have it by running their design, isn’t that an unbiased test?

My daughter and I share having gate 15 the Gate of Extremes. Extremes is energy in the rhythm channel. To me it is energy to maintain a rhythm or at times completely go off the deep end in one direction or behavior. I guess you could say people with the gate of extremes will sometimes take it past the limit.

A classic example of observable extremes is the show Family Guy by Seth MacFarlane. There are many sketches in Family Guy where they take a concept or an idea and then they take it to the extreme. One example is the chicken fights between Peter Griffin and a human sized chicken. When these fights occur in the show, they often go on for minutes exhausting nearly every possibility of defeating or injuring each other. Since the fights are violent and graphic, I chose to demonstrate with this clip instead, where Stewie is simply calling for his mother Lois repeatedly, repeatedly, repeatedly. They take a simple idea and well you will see.

Take a look…

If you watch Family Guy, you can see the gate of extremes poke its head out in the show in a variety of ways.

What is the purpose of extremes? Extremes is about bringing a return to balance by shifting things up in some way or form. In a way, it is an exploring energy to see how far we can go in one direction or not. It is an interesting energy to dance with as at times it can take you out of balance, while actually trying to get you back in balance. Can you say conundrum?

So as you go out in the world, take a look around you and see if you can see extremes peeking out at you? I am sure you will catch a glimpse at some point.

 

Seth MacFarlane’s full report.

Order your own report.